Month: February 2019

Foldable smartphones might not be the future: experts

On Sunday, China’s tech giant Huawei officially unveiled Huawei Mate X, its first foldable smar

tphone. That came just five days after Galaxy Fold, the first foldable smartphone of Samsung. But fol

dables might not be the future of smartphones, comment two experts with China Daily’s Zhang Zhouxiang:

Yuan Xuanhua, a renowned industrial designer with 20 years’ experience in smartphone engineering

Some media outlets have described foldable smartphones with so many sweet w

ords as if they were a technological breakthrough. Unfortunately, they are not. The te

chnology of foldable displays were invented as early as 20 years ago in a quite easy way — By replacing the glass th

at supports the display with foldable organic materials. Such displays can not only fold, but also curve.

Concerning the foldable screens of Huawei and Samsung, they have better displays with higher density rate and cl

earer, more stable display performance, but in essence they are still using the same technology. Therefore, f

oldable smartphones are more like a consumption-led innovation rather than a technology

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The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences endu

  red a series of missteps leading up to the telecast, beginning with the proposal to introduce a “popular film” category. That id

ea was quickly scuttled, as was a subsequent plan to move four awards into the commercial breaks to help st

reamline the ceremony, which prompted a rebellion from Academy members.

  In between, Kevin Hart was chosen to host the awards, before the resurfacing of homophobic socia

l-media posts prompted the comic to withdraw. After a period of confusion, it was finally co

nfirmed the awards would be mounted without a host, the first time that’s happened in 30 years.

  Much of the tumult surrounding the 91st annual Oscars can be traced back to la

st year’s awards — and more specifically, a precipitous ratings decline, fall

ing to an all-time low. Shortening the ceremony to three hours, or close to it, has been among the solutions that host net

work ABC has advocated as a means of stopping the bleeding from a Nielsen standpoint.

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said it wanted to capture the on-court tantrum of Ms

  Williams using satire, caricature, exaggeration and humor, and the

cartoon intended to depict her behavior as childish by showing her spitting a

pacifier out while she jumps up and down.”

  Widely criticized

  The cartoon showed Williams with large, exaggerated lips and nose reminiscent of racist depictions of black people in the US during the Jim Crow era.

  Williams’ opponent, Japan’s Naomi Osaka, is depicted as a skinny blonde woman, to whom the umpire is saying: “Can’t you just let her win?”

  The Japanese-American Osaka is of mixed heritage, and has Japanese and Haitian roots.

  ”Specifically, concern was expressed that the cartoon depicted Ms Willia

ms with large lips, a broad flat nose, a wild afro-styled ponytail hairstyle different to th

at worn by Ms. Williams during the match, and positioned in an ape-like pose,” said a statement from the press council.

  ”It was also noted that the cartoon should be considered in the context of the histo

ry of caricatures based on race and historical racist depictions of African-Americans.”

  ’Repugnant’When it was first published, the US-based National Association of Black Journalists said the cartoon was “repugnant on many levels.”

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In calling for “zero tolerance,” a policy whose definition appe

  ars to vary widely among Catholics, Openibo echoed the calls of dozens of abuse survivors gathered for protests and vigils on the streets of Vatican City this week.

  Wearing glasses and speaking gently though plainly, she addressed the Pope directly as “Brother Francis.” Openibo said she ad

mired his candor and willingness to admit mistakes he made in evaluating the claims of Chilean abuse s

urvivors about a notorious priest who was defrocked last year, and the bishops who covered up his crimes.

  ”Thank you for providing this opportunity for us to check and see whe

re we have acted strangely, ignorantly, secretly and complacently,” she said.

  Openibo also thanked the Pope for allowing her to address the assem

bly of 190 Catholic leaders, 114 of whom are bishops and cardinals from around the wor

ld. About a dozen of the participants are women, most Superiors General of religious orders.

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Iranians are paying for US sanctions with their health

  Ali only had two hours to save his baby’s life. He careened through traffic and sped along highway

s to an east Tehran government pharmacy. When he saw some 800 people queued outside the fac

ility, he dropped to his knees. Like him, they were waiting to obtain state-funded medications.

  ”I cried and screamed, begging people to let me get through,” Ali — whom we have not fully identified for security reasons — recalls.

  Eventually, he skipped the line and returned with the medicine in time for his one-year-old daughter, Dory, to recover.The incid

ent happened just as Iran’s landmark nuclear deal with six world powers led by the US was being sig

ned in 2015. It was a moment when Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had promised Iranians an easier life, free of me

dicinal and food shortages, and where desperate scenes such as Ali’s outside the pharmacy would become a thing of the past.

  Iran was halting its nuclear program in exchange for international sanctions relief, appearing to turn the pa

ge on a 36-year history of diplomatic and economic

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Emami recalls a family meeting in which an elderly woman’s

  children decided to go against his advice to discharge their mother with Alzheimer’s disease: “(The children) told me the patient is yours. We don’t have any money to spend on her.”

  ”I explained to the children that when she stays here, it means that her life expectancy is reduced by 80% … it means that she may have an infection and means the lady will die much sooner,” says Emami.Accompanied by her mother, 5-year-ol

d Dory visits Ali at work wearing a tutu skirt and a coat with leopard print. He carries her behind the bar where she pl

ays with empty juice dispensers. Later she settles on his lap and plays games on his smartphone.

  Trump admin pushes for tougher action on Iran, swipes at Europe

  It’s a break from her shuttling between home and the hospital, which she must visit at lea

st once a week. Sometimes the doctors determine that she has to stay in her hospital bed for sev

eral weeks. It’s a routine that will continue until she’s 18-years-old, her father says.

  But Ali says he’s dedicated to helping her have a normal life: “It doesn’t matter what Trump’s sanctions do, I’ll do whatever it takes to find her medication.”

  He puts a hand on his chest, puffing up his skinny frame. “I’ll even fly myself to get them for her. Whatever it takes.”

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Ali Shamkhani, secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security

  Council, was critical of Trump at a rally Saturday.

  ”The US has long been dealt blows by our country and our region and thus regularly bares its warmongering teeth,” Shamkhani said, according to state-run Press TV.

  ”And when a missile is tested thousands of kilometers away, after (issuing empty) threats, all their preside

nt does is put out a tweet,” he said in an apparent reference to North Korea’s missile tests.

  Iran Hostage Crisis Fast Facts

  Shamkhani said the United States is rethinking the election of Trump.

  ”American politicians and people are having second thoughts about their choice of presi

dent and acknowledge that the US has been defeated in materializing its foreign policy,” Shamkhani said.

  Iran’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said this week that Iran must resist the United States.

  ”Giving in to the US will make it impudent; the only way is to resist,” Khamenei said.

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In Iran’s ski resorts, for instance, signs admonish female

  to “obey Islamic affairs,” but many swap their headscarves for ski hats. The morality police

who for years were said to chase transgressors down the slopes on skis, have a dwindling presence in these areas.

  The penalty for breaking hijab rules is also being reduced, with fines of around $15 becoming more common than arrests.

  For commentators and activists, the incident in Tehran may be a sign of more acts of rebellion against the morality police to come.

  ”Iranians are very angry with morality police these days,” tweeted Masih Alineja

d, the Iranian activist behind the “White Wednesday” social media campaign against mandatory hijabs.

  Update: This article has been updated to remove a tweet containing images that CNN c

ould not independently verify. This is a developing story and will continue to be updated.

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Desperate and alone, Saudi sisters risk everything

  It was September 6, 2018. The two Saudi sisters were on a family vacation in Colombo, Sri Lanka. For weeks, they had helped their mother organize the trip, feigning

excitement at the possibility of two weeks away from Riyadh, but knowing that if all went to plan, they’d never go back.

  Failure was not an option. Every step of their escape from Saudi Arabia carried the threat of severe punishment or death.

  ”We knew the first time, if it’s not perfect, it will be the last time,” Reem says.

  CNN has changed the sisters’ names and is not showing their faces, at their request for their safety.

  The sisters say years of strict Islamic teaching and physical abuse at home had convinced them that they had no future in a socie

ty that places women under the enforced guardianship of men, and limits their aspirations.

  ”It’s slavery, because whatever the woman will do it’s the business of the male,” Rawan says.

  That’s why they say they renounced Islam.

  And that’s why aged 18 and 20, they stole back their own passports, hid their abayas under the b

edcovers, snuck out of their holiday home and boarded a flight from Colombo to Melbourne, via Hong Kong.

  The Hong Kong stopover was supposed to take less than two hours.

  Two hours has turned into five months.

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hey say they were sexually abused by sts, then silence

Lucie was just 16 when she became involved with a Catholic religious community after attending a holiday camp in Switzerland. At the time, she told CNN

,she was “very, very, very alone” and looking for friends and affection.
What she found at first was “really like a family

,” she said. But two years later — by which time she was preparing to become an “oblate,” a lay person affiliated with a rel

igious order — she says a pattern of sexual abuse by a charismatic priest who she considered her spiritual father began.

It took 15 years for Lucie — a pseudonym used at her request to protect her family — to realize that what she says she experienced over several months in the 1990

s was abuse. At the time, just 18 years old, she felt “disgusted” by the physical intimacy she says the priest for

ced on her but also wracked by guilt and powerless to stop him.
“It was like automatic you know. He wan

ted to go to the end — to ejaculation — and I was just like an object for him and I had a feeling he did this a lot of times,” she said.

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